Tag Archives: fiction books

10 Books to Read if You Love The Princess Bride

What do you love most about The Princess Bride? Is it the swashbuckling adventures? The wit and sarcasm? The tales of true love? No matter what it is that keeps you coming back to watching the movie or reading the book, there’s no denying that this story holds a special place in the hearts of children and adults of all ages.

And if you are craving more tales of evil pirates or stories of mythical creatures, there are a whole slew of other books you could read that have all the things you love about The Princess Bride (except ROUS’s, of course!).

Filled with romance, travel, and journeys to lands unknown, these 10 books are sure to satisfy whatever craving you have to jump back into a story that helps you escape reality and indulge in the comfort of your own imagination.

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10 Books to Read if You Love The Princess Bride

The Princess Bride, William Goldman
Granted, the book is slightly different from the film, but chances are if you love the movie, you’re gonna love the book…at least give it a try for Prince Humperdinck alone!

As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride, Cary Elwes
Well, this is just a no-brainer. Written by Cary Elwes (Westley), As You Wish explores the making and production of The Princess Bride film, complete with behind-the-scene stories and memories from the entire cast.

Stardust, Neil Gaiman
Take a journey into a magical land as a young boy pursues his one true love. Sound familiar? This charming story features the adventure and humor that make The Princess Bride so wonderful, as well as a little romance!

The Last Unicorn, Peter S. Beagle
This fantastical quest of concealed identity is the perfect book to cozy up with if you love The Princess Bride. The Last Unicorn was also made into a wonderfully cheesy movie if you’d rather indulge in the story that way.

The Thousand Autumns, Jacob de Zoet
The strength of true love, the power of faith, the thrill of the adventure…it’s all here in The Thousand Autumns by Jacob de Zoet.

Candide, Voltaire
Pirates? Check. Exciting adventures? Check. Love and revenge? Check and check. Candide is a breathless tour of far off lands and the quest for true love.

Ivanhoe, Sir Walter Scott
Ivanhoe may not have the wit and sarcasm of The Princess Bride, but it sure packs in the romance.

Guenevere: Queen of the Summer Country, Rosalind Miles
Guenevere is a romantic and heart-wrenching narrative, complete with all the pageantry, politics, war, lust, love, and conflict the Brits so gallantly require in their legends. A fairy tale likened to Buttercup’s adventures, Guenevere is sure to appease lovers of the King Arthur legends and romantic fairy tales.

Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
If you love Buttercup’s wit and sass, chances are you’re gonna fall in love with Elizabeth Bennett from Pride and Prejudice. A story about romance, love, and a fun-loving sarcastic leading lady, Pride and Prejudice is one swashbuckling pirate away from The Princess Bride.

The Book of Lost Things, John Connolly
A fantastic book filled with epic adventures, lots of magical heroes and monsters, and travels in far off lands, The Book of Lost Things is maybe one of my favorite novels of all time. While it lacks the romance of The Princess Bride, it makes up for it in amazing characters and harrowing journeys.

 

Looking for a new book to read? Check in every Friday for a “Bee Happy” post, where I share reviews of books I’ve read or other book-themed lists.

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29 Audiobooks Read by Celebrities

As an avid book-smeller, there’s really nothing that can replace sitting down with an old book and a warm cup of coffee…snuggling up under a blanket as a storm rolls in…or watching the late summer afternoons slowly turn into night…those are my favorite times to read – but let’s be honest, sometimes it’s hard to find moments in the day to actually sit down and relax with a book.

Try as you might, the laundry still has to get done, dishes have to be cleaned, kids have to be transported from one activity to the next…not to mention when you finally do have time to sit down, opening a book and reading might just be enough to instantly put you into a deep sleep.

Thankfully, us bookworms can still get our shizz done and enjoy a little literary flair with the invention of the audiobook.  Though books on tape, books on CD, hell – even books on 45’s – have been around for a long time, the ability to listen to a book via the Internet is certainly a game-changer…and readers of all ages and types are enjoying services like Audible, Libravox, and even iTunes to listen to their favorite books as they drive, walk, work, or cook.

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And, when it comes to audiobooks, the voice is the thing…a dull voice makes for a dull story.  To help introduce readers to older classics and new possible best-sellers, publishers have started to reach out to celebrities to offer their voices to the words of Jane Austen, Mark Twain, Harper Lee, Earnest Hemingway, Roald Dahl, and so many more…and celebrities of all calibers have answered the call.

So whether you’re jumping in your car for a summer road trip or snuggling up under a blanket watching a late summer storm, these audiobooks are sure to keep you company…soothing you, entertaining you, enlightening you – like an old friend – with a voice you’ve come to know and love.

 

29 Audiobooks Read by Celebrities

The End the Affair, Graham Greene
Narrated by:  Colin Firth
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The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, L. Frank Baum
Narrated by:  Anne Hathaway
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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mark Twain
Narrated by:  Nick Offerman
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The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood
Narrated by:  Claire Danes
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To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf
Narrated by:  Nicole Kidman
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A Rage in Harlem, Chester Himes
Narrated by:  Samuel L. Jackson
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Being There, Jerzy Kosinski
Narrated by:  Dustin Hoffman
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Slouching Towards Bethlehem, Joan Didion
Narrated by:  Diane Keaton
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The Member of the Wedding, Carson McCullers
Narrated by:  Susan Sarandon
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Dracula, Bram Stoker
Narrated by:  Alan Cumming
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The Human Comedy, William Saroyan
Narrated by:  Meg Ryan
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Life, Keith Richards
Narrated by:  Johnny Depp
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Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy
Narrated by:  Maggie Gyllenhaal
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A Farewell to Arms, Ernest Hemingway
Narrated by:  John Slattery
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A Series of Unfortunate Events, Lemony Snicket
Narrated by:  Tim Curry
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Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov
Narrated by:  Jeremy Irons
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Anne of Green Gables, Lucy Maud Montgomery
Narrated by:  Rachel McAdams
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Matilda, Roald Dahl
Narrated by:  Kate Winslet
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To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee
Narrated by:  Sissy Spacek
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Go Set a Watchman, Harper Lee
Narrated by:  Reese Witherspoon
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The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams
Narrated by:  Stephen Fry
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Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen
Narrated by:  Rosamund Pike
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Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders
Narrated by:  Nick Offerman, David Sedaris, Lena Dunham, and more
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The Things They Carried, Tim O’Brien
Narrated by:  Bryan Cranston
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The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald
Narrated by:  Jake Gyllenhaal
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Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut
Narrated by:  James Franco
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Of Mice and Men, John Steinbeck
Narrated by:  Gary Sinese
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Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, J.K. Rowling
Narrated by:  Eddie Redmayne
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Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Truman Capote
Narrated by:  Michael C. Hall
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Looking for a new book to read? Check in every Friday for a “Bee Happy” post, where I share reviews of books I’ve read or other book-themed lists.

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Before the Fall Book Review

I love me a good survival story.  Whether it’s surviving a zombie apocalypse, traveling the Alaskan territories, or hiking the Amazon trail, I get such a high from humans beating all the odds to ensure their own survival.

Why?  I have no idea.  I guess subconsciously I desire to go on my own daring adventures…risking the elements and taking my body to the limit in the face of ultimate danger.  So far, camping in a park is about as rugged as I’ve gotten…but there’s still time!

Recently I went on a little trip to visit my alma mater and, since it’s about a 7 hour drive up to Marquette, MI, I stopped at my library to pick up a story to listen to on the way.  I knew it would have to be something that would keep me interested during those looooooong hours driving up through Wisconsin…so I needed something exciting, enticing, and engaging…

TO THE THRILLER SECTION I WENT!

Since I’d be driving by myself through the backwoods of Michigan, I didn’t want anything too scary, so I settled on a story about a plane crash called Before the Fall.

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Little did I know that this would turn out to be such a gem in the realm of survival fiction…told with such fluidity and honesty that I completely found myself engrossed in this amazing tale of strength and the human condition.

On a foggy summer night, eleven people board a small plane departing Martha’s Vineyard, heading for New York.  Sixteen minutes later, the unthinkable happens: the plane crashes into the ocean and most of the passengers disappear.  The only survivors are a down-on-his-luck painter named Scott Burrows and a young four-year-old boy, who is now the last remaining member of a wealthy and powerful family.

With chapters that weave between the aftermath of the tragedy and the backstories of the passengers and crew members, the reasons behind the accident begin to unfold…and as the media frenzy spirals out of control with false accusations and media outrage, the fragile relationship between the two survivors begins to grow and blossom…and truly is the beating heart of this story.

A unique POV story that gives almost every character a moment in the spotlight, Before the Fall aims to highlight the life of each passenger before they boarded that small plane from Martha’s Vineyard.  It puts into perspective how small events in their lives lead them to the pinnacle moment where most of them perished…and also highlights why Scott, a man who wasn’t even supposed to be on the plane at all, was one of the only ones to survive the horrific accident.

A bittersweet and tragic story about fate and human nature, Before the Fall is a spot-on novel about what humans – and the media – will do to survive.

 

Looking for a new book to read? Check in every Friday for a “Bee Happy” post, where I share reviews of books I’ve read or other book-themed lists.

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Daytripper Book Review

I picked up Daytripper on a whim.  I was looking for a new graphic novel to read and was just browsing through the small, yet substantial, graphic novel section of my local library.  I noticed the cover of Daytripper and was slightly intrigued.  I thumbed through it and the illustrations alone sucked me in.  When I got home and started reading, I had no idea what I was getting myself into…and little did I know I was about to embark on a book that would overwhelm me in every way possible.

After I read Daytripper, I just sat in my living room and cried.  I cried my bloody eyes out.  I went back and thumbed through it again, then cried some more.  It wasn’t that it was sad…it was just so beautiful, so profound.  On the surface level, it is a story about death…but if you really dig in deep, it’s so much more than that.  It’s a story about choices, about deciding to stay or go.  It’s a story about moments, about those events that change and shape your life, and those quiet intimate seconds you share with a loved one.  It’s a story about beginnings and endings and all the moments in between that help shape and mold us into who we are.

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The birth of Bras de Oliva Domingos was a miracle in and of itself.  The son of a famous Brazilian writer, Bras was born in the middle of a blackout and somehow survived.  Now, as a young adult, Bras is an inspiring writer himself, spending his days writing obituaries for the local paper…trying to find the moments, tell the stories, that made these people who they were while his story has barley just begun.

Throughout Daytripper, Bras tries to figure out his own stories…tries to piece together the moments that have helped shape his life.  Each chapter introduces us to someone important in Bras’s life, then ends with Bras’s death.  Each death comes about differently as a result of a choice Bras made.  Each chapter begs the question, “What is life and how, in death, is life valued?”.

This amazing story is accompanied with stunning watercolor illustrations, made to give you the feeling of moving through a dream.  A somewhat quiet comic with little dialogue, Daytripper relies on subtle glances, soft hugs, quiet moments to help tell the story.  It’s a lyrical, emotional and visual journey that uses those intimate moments to ask the big questions.

The message of Daytripper lies in the answer to a question we’ve all asked ourselves at one point:  What are the most important days of your life?  Is it the moment you’re born?  Is it when you meet your first love?  When you have your first kiss?  When you see your child in your arms?  When you finally find your dream job?  Or maybe the most important days are the days where nothing happens…when you see a bird in a tree or feel fresh rain on your face.  Maybe the important days are the ones you spend sitting on the couch with your loved one or just playing in the park with your dog.

Like all the best stories, Daytripper is a story about stories…about beginnings and endings.  It’s about choices, big and small, that shape us, mold us, create us.

Perhaps the best way to sum up Daytripper is with this interaction between young Bras and his father, taken from the book itself:

 

Looking for a new book to read? Check in every Friday for a “Bee Happy” post, where I share reviews of books I’ve read or other book-themed lists.

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What Book Should You Read Based on Your Favorite FRIEND?

You know you’ve got one!  You may SAY you love all the FRIENDS equally, but we all have our favorites…by now you should know who mine is!

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Whether you’re more drawn to Chandler because of his clever one-liners or Phoebe because of her love of everything whimsy and imaginative, your top FRIEND choice can help dictate what’s next up in your reading list!

So no matter who’s been there for you when you needed them, if you’re still missing FRIENDS, you can get a little taste of your favorite TV BFF with this collection of FRIENDS-inspired books!

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If Your Favorite FRIEND is Monica friends frustrated courteney cox monica geller stressed GIF

Read The Joy of Cooking, by Irma S. Rombauer
cvr9780743246262_9780743246262_hrConsidered to be one of the best cookbooks of all time, The Joy of Cooking is a staple in the home of any food lover.  While most chefs probably have a copy stained with food and filled with crumbs, Monica’s is probably in pristine condition upon her shelf.

If Your Favorite FRIEND is Chandler tv dancing 90s friends happy dance GIF

Read Sh*t My Dad Says, by Justin Halpern
shitdadsezFilled with the best dad-isms you’ve ever heard, Sh*t My Dad Says is sure to be a little look into the future of Chandler Bing as a father.  Filled with amazing one-liners that even Chandler would be proud of, this collection of wit and humor couldn’t BE any better.

If Your Favorite FRIEND is Phoebe
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Read The Artist in the Office, by Summer Pierre
AITO_CoverThis inspirational and interactive book is great for all the Pheobe’s of the world…encouraging small acts of creativity to happen throughout the day, every day.  Take a picture of every coffee mug you see, take a lunchtime adventure, collect doodles and reassemble them…the possibilities are endless!

If Your Favorite FRIEND is Rachel
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Read The Glass of Fashion, by Cecil Beaton51UDgV-SMRLThe Glass of Fashion was written by iconic photographer, Cecil Beaton.  It explores the faces and models that shaped the golden age of fashion.  Filled with illustrations and personal stories about Chanel, Dior and Balenciaga, this is one book that Rachel would use as motivation and inspiration.

If Your Favorite FRIEND is Joey
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Read The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P., by Adelle Waldman
The_Love_Affairs_of_Nathaniel_P._book_coverNate has it all…a rising career, his choice of beautiful women…but he’s constantly struggling with his own status anxiety and his search for what it really means to be happy.  An absorbing tale of women, sex and love, this is one book that Joey (hopefully!) wouldn’t have to throw in the freezer!

If Your Favorite FRIEND is Ross friends scream ross david schwimmer friends tv GIF

Read Jurassic Park, by Michael CrichtonJurassicparkThe ultimate in dinosaur fiction, Jurassic Park is a classic that Ross would surely have on his bookshelf.  Much different from the movie of the same name, the novel explores the science behind these dinosaurs…a topic Ross would probably love to discuss and argue about to anyone gullible enough to listen!

 

 

Looking for a new book to read? Check in every Friday for a “Bee Happy” post, where I share reviews of books I’ve read or other book-themed lists.

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20 Books that Changed My Life

As readers, we all have an ever-growing list of favorite books.  Books we’ve lived in, books we’ve cherished, and books we’ve read again and again…and tucked in that long list of favorite novels and stories is a much shorter list of books that have shaped and molded us as human beings…books that have altered our thinking and opened our eyes to new ways of looking at life.  These are the books that will forever hold a place in your heart (and on your shelf!) and may even be the books you find yourself coming back to again and again, if not just to smell their familiar smell or run your fingers up and down the worn cover page.

I was recently asked what this list would be for me…and let me tell you, it was a challenging task.  I feel like every book I read stays with me and becomes a part of me…and to fine-tune that list to a handful of books that have had such a profound impact on me that they CHANGED MY LIFE…well, that’s a tall order!

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But I love a good challenge!  After many, many hours of thought and a few cups of coffee to help get me through, here is my list of 20 books that have changed my life.  A few of these are also on my list of favorite books, but not all of them.  Books like Eating Animals and Being Mortal, though well-written and thought-provoking, were not what I would call ENJOYABLE reads…but they had such an impact on me that I had to add them to this list.

If you love reading and enjoy being swept up in literature, this is a fun exercise to try!  Take a moment and think back on your times spent snuggled in bed curled up with a book and see if you can’t recount the books that helped shape and mold you into the wonderful person you are today.

 

Books that Taught Me About Love and Loss:

Revolutionary Road, Richard Yates
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A marriage that looks perfect from the outside is anything but on the inside. A story that completely broke my heart and taught me that things aren’t always as they seem, Revolutionary Road is a raw and realistic portrayal of the “ideal American family”.

It’s Called a Breakup Because It’s Broken, Greg Behrendt and Amiira Ruotola-Behrehdt
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Filled with inspiring stories and quotes, It’s Called a Breakup Because It’s Broken was the book that got me through my first big break-up. Yes, it was super cheesy, but it told me the things I was unwilling to hear from my friends and family and it helped me get back up on my feet during a time I felt I had hit rock bottom.

A Monster Calls, Patrick Ness
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No book, no person, no song has so perfectly described what it’s like to live with someone who is terminally ill. I read A Monster Calls a few years after my dad died and the wound was ripped right the F open. I related to this book on a deep and emotional level…and it so perfectly described feelings I never thought could be put into words.

Being Mortal, Atul Gawande
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A book about dying with grace and dignity, Being Mortal tries to humanize the ultimate fate we all fear. Written by Dr. Gawande, this book takes readers into places like nursing homes and care centers to better understand how the elderly can age without losing their sense of humanity.

Peter Pan, J.M. Barrie
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A simple story about a boy who doesn’t want to grow up, Peter Pan meant so much more to me after my first experience with death. The story of Peter Pan is quite different from what Disney would have you believe, and after experiencing loss, I felt myself relating so much more to this little boy who just wanted to stay young and joyful forever.

Books that Led to Professional Development:

Creativity, Inc., Ed Catmull
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I cannot praise this book enough. Creativity, Inc. is written by one of the founders of Pixar, Ed Catmull. In this management how-to, he discusses what it takes to be a good manager and a good employee. He lays the groundwork for what makes a productive business run and shows readers that it actually is possible to really love what you do. This is the book that inspired me to quit the job that had me in a near constant state of depression and to find something that challenged me intellectually and professionally.

The Artist in the Office, Summer Pierre
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An interactive book about how to have fun at a 9-5 job, The Artist in the Office helps readers find creative outlets throughout the day…encouraging imagination, inspiring creativity, and overall making happier and healthier employees…all while still making time for those dang TPS reports.

Books that Changed the Way I Think:

Eating Animals, Jonathan Safran Foer
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A brutally honest look at the cost of farming and eating meat, Eating Animals was a true eye-opener in the best possible way. Though Jonathan Safran Foer is a vegetarian, the point of his book is not to convert meat eaters, but to educate them. Foer pulls back the curtain on companies like Tyson to reveal what is really going on behind closed doors. This book made me sick to my stomach…and it forever changed how I eat and buy my food.

The Alchemist, Paulo Coelho
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A truly inspirational story about listening to your heart and following your dreams, The Alchemist should be required reading for everyone. A story about a shepherd who yearns to travel the world, this book is equal parts fairy tale and spiritual enlightenment. Similar to The Little Prince in its message, The Alchemist – for me at least – was likened to a religious experience.

The Best of Cooking Light, Cooking Light Magazine
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The Best of Cooking Light was the first cookbook I ever owned. I don’t remember where I got it, it may have been a gift or something I picked up in a budget bin at my local bookstore, but when I was living on my own, this cookbook was my bible. I lived off these recipes and I still use it to this day. It’s filled with food stains and the pages are crinkled from spilled water, but I still love it and cherish the memories of learning to cook with this book by my side.

Alone in the Kitchen with an Eggplant, Jenni Ferrari-Adler
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Filled with hilarious and relatable essays about cooking for one and living alone, Alone in the Kitchen with an Eggplant was the friend I needed during a time when I felt so secluded.

The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Exupery
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With such simple prose and a simple plot, The Little Prince digs deep into the psyche, unearthing thoughts about love, loss, friendship, responsibility, imagination, and so much more. I’ve read it several times, often in one sitting, and find myself smiling and crying time after time.

Books that Shaped My Childhood:

The Lorax, Dr. Seuss
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The Lorax was the first book I read about what it means to stand up for what you believe in. It was my dad’s favorite Dr. Seuss book and he would read it to me often when I was growing up. Filled with inspiring messages about believing in yourself, encouraging change, and giving a voice to those who don’t have one, The Lorax had a profound impact on my understanding of mindless progress.

The Polar Express, Chris Van Allsburg
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I still can’t read The Polar Express without crying. A magical story about the true spirit of Christmas, The Polar Express reawakens my love for Christmas every time I read it. The magic of hearing the bell is something I hold personally near and dear to my heart, as my dad had jingle bells all over the house all year long. Needless to say, I still hear the bells ring, year after year.

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J.K. Rowling
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In all honesty, every one of the Harry Potter books could be on this list…but Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was my introduction into the Harry Potter universe. After powering through the first three novels, I went to the midnight release (in costume) of this book and stayed up reading it all night long. I took it with me to the Taste of Chicago the following day and walked all over the city with this 600+ book in hand. It was this book that swept me up into the magic of Hogwarts and was my first introduction into the Harry Potter fandom culture.

My Father’s Daughter, Tina Sinatra
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My Father’s Daughter was not the first Sinatra book I’ve ever read, nor will it be the last…but I found it to be the most truthful. Written by his daughter, Tina Sinatra, My Father’s Daughter is an intimate, honest, and loving tribute to a man the world rarely got to see. Parts of it broke my heart…and parts of it made me love Sinatra all the more. Told with genuine love and respect for her father and her family, Tina Sinatra’s memoir offers a peek into the private life of one of the world’s most popular entertainers.

The Book of Lost Things, John Connolly
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This is one of the only books I finished, then immediately started again. I’ve read this book so many times that the spine is starting to fray. A story similar to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, but much, much darker, The Book of Lost Things is a story filled with evil monsters, big heroes, and journeys into worlds unknown. This book took me away and completely immersed me another world, something that rarely happens when I read fiction. The message of this book is quite simple, but the characters are so imaginative and interesting and I have a new experience with this book every time I read it.

Books that Shaped My Educational Development:

The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger
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The ultimate coming-of-age story about a young boy exploring the New York underground, The Catcher in the Rye is the book that made me fall in love with literature. I remember reading it in high school and again in college…both times it opened my eyes to the amazing character development and plot that this story lays out for the reader. Confused and disillusioned, Holden Caulfield searches for truth and honesty among a world of “phoniness” and finds it near impossible to place himself in this unforgiving culture. A novel that speaks to anyone who has struggled through their adolescence, A Catcher in the Rye remains one of my favorite books of all time.

Solar Storms, Linda Hogan
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It was this book that inspired me to follow a Native American educational path during my time in college. I read Solar Storms in one of my English lit classes and fell in love with the Native culture and views on life and death. I felt an instant connection with this novel and it opened my eyes to an educational outlet I never knew was there for me.

The Uses of Enchantment, Bruno Bettelheim
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A brilliant take on fairy tale criticism, The Uses of Enchantment was the book that inspired a life-long obsession with fairy tales. As if it couldn’t get any nerdier, I actually read this book the first time FOR FUN, then again for required reading in my Fairy Tale class in college. This book breaks down the classic tales we all know and love and digs deep into the deeper meanings behind the red cape, the wolf in the woods, the prick of the pin and so much more.

Looking for a new book to read? Check in every Friday for a “Bee Happy” post, where I share reviews of books I’ve read or other book-themed lists.

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Literary Wonderlands Book Review

Whether your heart belongs in The Shire, Hogwarts, Winterfell, Wonderland, Neverland, or Narnia, it’s clear that books have a way of transporting us to worlds unknown.  Since the Greek and Roman myths and the fairy tales of The Brothers Grimm, authors and poets have created magical places that oftentimes exist only in our imaginations.

Filled with new vocabulary, or sometimes new languages entirely, these literary worlds are often as much of a character to a book as the hero himself.  They give us a setting, a feeling, a grounding in our story and provide the framework to help us assemble these towns, cities, buildings, and universes in our heads.

But before we could dream up our own Hogwarts or create our own version of Camelot, someone had to give us the pieces.  What inspired these authors to create these magical places?  What was the basis for the school in Never Let Me Go, the characters of Narnia, or the language of the Dothraki?

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In Literary Wonderlands: A Journey to 100 of the Greatest Fictional Worlds Ever Created, a team of editors and writers attempt to transport themselves into some of our favorite literary worlds and explore it as only the best travelers can.  Filled with beautiful illustrations and photos, each chapter in Literary Wonderlands is like a journey into another story and makes it oh so easy to be swept up in the magic of these otherworldly places.

Starting with ancient myths and legends like Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, and Beowulf, and moving all the way into the computer age with favorites like The Hunger Games, Cloud Atlas, and A Game of Thrones, Literary Wonderlands features essays on 100 magical books that all feature, for lack of a better term, a literary wonderland.  Writers attempt to figure out the inspiration for these worlds, try to find the basis for the language and the make-up, and even sometimes try to pinpoint them geographically based on written descriptions and maps.

Though it’s jam-packed with fun tidbits and information, this book could easily be categorized as a coffee table book, just for the shear amount of illustrations and photography included here.  If the words don’t do enough to transport you, the photos surely will…and don’t be surprised if you end up adding a few books to your “To Read” list on Goodreads after reading this!

A beautiful book that’s just as eye-catching as it is informative, Literary Wonderlands is sure to add a few more stops to the literary road trip you dream up in your head.

Looking for a new book to read? Check in every Friday for a “Bee Happy” post, where I share reviews of books I’ve read or other book-themed lists.

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